Why Study Bioengineering?

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Why Study Bioengineering?

Bioengineering is a rapidly growing field that offers students a unique blend of biology and engineering. This interdisciplinary field provides students with the opportunity to solve real-world problems using both science and math skills. Bioengineers work on everything from developing new medical technologies to creating more environmentally friendly ways to produce fuel.

One of the best things about being a bioengineer is that you are on the frontier of tomorrow’s medicine, health care, and biological research. You’ll be involved in projects that will make people healthier and more productive while protecting or restoring the environment.

For example, did you know…

  • Bioengineers are paving the way toward growing human organs inside animals?
  • They help to fight human blindness by developing new technologies for early detection of dangerous retinal diseases?
  • Bioengineers are working on ways to make vaccines using plants instead of animals?
  • Small, flexible sensors can be placed in the body and monitor blood pressure or heart rate?

These types of projects could all be a part of your future as a bioengineer! So if you’re interested in making a difference in the world and using your math and science skills to do it, bioengineering is the perfect field for you.

1. What is Bioengineering?

Bioengineering is a branch of engineering that applies the principles of biology and the techniques of engineering to create usable, affordable products and therapies for the improvement of human health. The work of a bioengineer ranges from the design of artificial organs to the study of disease, and it provides work for many types of engineers.

2. What is Interesting about Bioengineering?

In addition to their involvement in bionics, biomedical engineers also work design and build other artificial organs, such as kidneys and hearts, cardiac pacemakers, and hearing aids. They also create artificial legs, joints, and vessels for tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, medical devices, and drug delivery. Bioengineering is a highly diverse field, with opportunities for engineers to work on projects in a wide range of applications. Some of the most exciting challenges bioengineers face include developing therapies that can regenerate damaged tissues and organs, devising new methods for delivering drugs to diseased cells, and designing medical devices that can be safely integrated into a living system.

Yes, bioengineers are making more money than ever before. The Bureau of Labor Statistics Occupational Employment Statistics for Biomedical Engineers reported that there were 137,800 employed biomedical engineers in America alone. Assuming an average hourly wage of $40 means these engineers are pulling in a whopping annual income of around 6.8 billion dollars.

This is a massive increase from the same report from 5 years ago, where they reported 93,280 employed biomedical engineers with an average hourly wage of $32. Inflation has been around 16% over those past five years, which means these engineers have gotten a 40% raise since 2009.

The main reason for this increase in pay for bioengineers is due to the ever-increasing research in the medical and pharmaceutical industries. There is a significant demand for biomedical engineers to develop new technologies and equipment used in hospitals and other healthcare facilities. As we continue to improve our understanding of the human body, the demand for equipment that can do what we want becomes greater. Luckily many universities around America are researching various ways that are developing new biomedical engineering technology.

One college that continues to stand out for doing this is the University of California, Berkeley. This school has long been known as an excellent place for bioengineering and other science fields due to its many advanced laboratories and equipment. Most recently, they have begun to research how we can use stem cells to help cure cancer. They were recently able to develop a way to target specific parts of the tumor that cancer cells grow in. These targeted areas are then placed with the stem cells, which allows them to be attracted to the tumor and kill it. This is just one example of how biomedical engineering is advancing our society. The future of bioengineering, especially in America, is looking bright.

2015 BLS – Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), “Occupational Employment and Wages, May 2014: 27-2042 Biomedical Engineers.” U.S. Department of Labor, n.d. Web. 02 July 2015

3. What Biomedical Engineers Do?

Typically, bioengineers and biomedical engineers undertake the following: Design medical equipment and gadgets such as artificial internal organs, body part replacements, and diagnostic tools. Biomedical equipment installation, maintenance, and technical assistance Work with production personnel to ensure that biomedical equipment is safe and functional. Educate clinicians and others on how to utilize biomedical equipment properly. Investigate how engineering ideas apply to biological systems in collaboration with scientists.

Using statistical or modeling tools, create statistical models or simulations. Prepare processes and research papers, as well as produce technical reports and reports. Present your findings to many people, including scientists, physicians, managers, other engineers, and the general public. As needed, design or conduct follow-up experiments.

  • Typically, bioengineers and biomedical engineers undertake the following:
  • Design medical equipment and gadgets such as artificial internal organs, body part replacements, and diagnostic tools.
  • Biomedical equipment installation, maintenance, and technical assistance
  • Work with production personnel to ensure that biomedical equipment is safe and functional.
  • Educate clinicians and others on how to utilize biomedical equipment properly.
  • Investigate how engineering ideas apply to biological systems in collaboration with scientists.
  • Using statistical or modeling tools, create statistical models or simulations.
  • Prepare processes and research papers, as well as produce technical reports and reports.
  • Present your findings to many people, including scientists, physicians, managers, other engineers, and the general public.
  • As needed, design or conduct follow-up experiments.

4. How has the Demand for Bioengineers Changed over Time?

The demand for bioengineers has consistently been on the rise in America. The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) states that the occupation of biomedical engineers is projected to grow by 23% from 2014-2024. This growth is much faster than the average for all occupations. A few factors have contributed to this increase in demand, including the increasing elderly population and the rising number of chronic diseases. Additionally, as medical technology advances, there is a greater need for bioengineers to design new equipment and gadgets. All of these factors point to one thing: The demand for bioengineers will only continue to grow in America. So if you are thinking about entering this field, know that there is an excellent chance to find a job.

5. Which Areas in this Career are Expected to Grow the Fastest?

The growth in the cities with bioengineering jobs will vary depending on several factors, including local population size and industry presence. However, according to data from the BLS, some of the top ten areas in the country with the most growth of bioengineering jobs were:

1. Detroit-Warren-Dearborn, MI (23%)

4. New York-Newark-Jersey City, NY (22%)

5. Phoenix-Mesa-Scottsdale, AZ (20%)

6. Provo-Orem, UT (19%)

7. Los Angeles-Long Beach-Anaheim, CA (17%)

8. Orlando-Kissimmee-Sanford, FL (17%)

9. Boston-Cambridge-Newton, MA NECTA Division (16%)

10. St. Louis, MO-IL (15%)

As you can see from this data, many cities have experienced a surge of bioengineering jobs over the past few years. This includes places such as Detroit and Phoenix, and two areas hit hard by economic downturns. With a growing number of bioengineers working in these cities, there is a good chance for revival.

6. What College is Best for Bioengineering?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question. Different students may have different interests and preferences, meaning they will want to attend a different college. However, if you are looking for a few general recommendations, then the following colleges are an excellent place to start:

1. University of California, Berkeley

2. Johns Hopkins University

3. Georgia Institute of Technology

4. University of Minnesota

5. Oregon State University

6. Purdue University

7. the University of Texas at Austin

8. North Carolina State University

9. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

10. Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University

These are just a few of the many excellent colleges that offer bioengineering programs. Do your research, and find the school that is best for you.

Portrait of African American pharmacist nurse typing medical prescription checking pharmaceutical medication expertise on computer. Woman assistance working in a hospital office. Healthcare check

7. How Advances in Bioengineering Will Help Humanity by Warding off Diseases

As a species, humans have always been on a constant quest for new ways to improve their lives and society as a whole. That being said, the result is often dependent on the innovation of those same human minds that envisioned new ideas and methods of tackling problems or tasks. In our current world, there are many benefits from advances in medicine-related technologies coming from bioengineering which has aided in saving many people’s lives due to chronic diseases such as diabetes. One example is insulin pumps – these devices regulate blood sugar levels through artificial delivery of insulin when needed throughout the day or evening. At the same time, meal times remain unaffected because it doesn’t require any punctures to the skin with shots. By continuously wearing the pump, it gives people with diabetes more freedom and flexibility. It is bioengineering like this that has paved the way to preventative treatments as well as opposed to just simply curing illnesses after they have taken hold.

In short, bioengineering has helped us better understand how human biology works and, in turn, create new technologies to improve our quality of life.

8. Where Do You See Bioengineering in 20 Years?

Bioengineering is already having a substantial impact on medicine and has for some time now. Bioengineered skin, bones, heart valves, and even artificial kidneys are used to help save the lives of those who have significant injuries or chronic conditions that require frequent surgeries. New developments are being made all the time, and in 20 years, bioengineering will likely be used to help treat a variety of other chronic diseases. In addition, there may be new applications of bioengineering that we cannot even imagine today. So, whatever happens in the next 20 years, it is sure that bioengineering will continue to play a significant role in shaping our world for the better.

In conclusion, bioengineering is a rapidly growing field that offers many opportunities for those interested in the sciences. The above information provides just a snapshot of what this field entails and the amazing things that it is capable of accomplishing. If you are curious about bioengineering and would like to learn more, then be sure to do your research and attend a college that offers this major.

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