Athletic Trainer Career Path

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Athletic Trainer Career Path

Becoming an athletic trainer is a great way to help people maintain their health and well-being. Athletic trainers work with individuals, teams, and organizations to prevent and treat injuries. They may also guide nutrition, hydration, and other lifestyle choices that can impact an individual’s health. If you’re interested in becoming an athletic trainer, read on for more information about the career path and what it takes to become one.

What Is an Athletic Trainer?

An athletic trainer is a health care professional who specializes in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of injuries to athletes and other physically active people. Athletic trainers typically work with individual athletes, teams, or organizations, and they may be employed by a school, hospital, clinic, or sports team.

They may be employed by athletic organizations such as schools, colleges, and professional sports teams or work in private practice. Athletic trainers may also provide guidance on nutrition, hydration, and other lifestyle choices that can impact an individual’s health and performance.

What Do Athletic Trainers Do?

Athletic trainers typically work with individual athletes, teams, or organizations. They may be employed by a school, hospital, clinic, or sports team. 

They may be employed by athletic organizations such as schools, colleges, and professional sports teams, or they may work in private practice. Athletic trainers may also provide guidance on nutrition, hydration, and other lifestyle choices that can impact an individual’s health and performance.

Athletic trainers work with a variety of people, from professional athletes to weekend warriors. They are responsible for helping people to maintain their health and preventing injuries from occurring. In the event that an injury does occur, athletic trainers are responsible for providing treatment.

Some of the Treatments That an Athletic Trainer May Provide Include

  • Rest- This is often the first step in healing an injury. The athletic trainer may recommend that the injured person take a break from the activity that caused the injury.
  • Ice- This can help to reduce swelling and pain.
  • Compression- This can help to support the injured area and reduce swelling.
  • Elevation- This can help to reduce swelling by promoting blood flow.
  • Therapy- The athletic trainer may prescribe physical therapy exercises to help the person heal.
  • Medication- The athletic trainer may prescribe medication to help with pain relief or healing.

What Are the Skills Needed to Become an Athletic Trainer?

The skills needed to become an athletic trainer include:

First Aid and CPR- Athletic trainers must be able to provide first aid in the event of an injury. They must also be certified in CPR in order to comply with state laws.

Healthcare Knowledge- Athletic trainers must have a basic understanding of human anatomy and physiology. They must also be familiar with the types of injuries that can occur during physical activity.

Patience and Listening Skills- Athletic trainers must be able to communicate effectively with their patients. They must also be patient when helping people to recover from injuries.

Problem-Solving Skills- Athletic trainers must be able to identify and treat injuries as they occur. They must also be able to come up with strategies to prevent injuries from happening.

Some of the Other Skills Needed to Become an Athletic Trainer Include

Organizational Skills- Athletic trainers must be able to manage their time effectively. They must also be able to keep track of the patients that they are treating.
Flexibility- Athletic trainers may need to work odd hours or weekends in order to accommodate the schedules of their patients.
Critical thinking skills- Athletic trainers must be able to evaluate the information that they receive and make sound decisions.
Communication skills- Athletic trainers must be able to communicate effectively with their patients, other health professionals, and coaches.
Customer service skills- Athletic trainers may need to interact with the public and provide customer service.

What Are the Duties of an Athletic Trainer?

The duties of an athletic trainer vary depending on their level of experience and specialization. However, some of the common duties of an athletic trainer include:

Evaluating patients- Athletic trainers must evaluate patients in order to identify any potential injuries.
Treating injuries- Athletic trainers must provide treatment to injured patients. This may include first aid, ice packs, compression, and elevation.
Creating treatment plans- Athletic trainers must create treatment plans for their patients in order to help them recover from injuries.
Providing education- Athletic trainers must provide education to their patients on how to prevent injuries from occurring.
Monitoring progress- Athletic trainers must monitor the progress of their patients to ensure that they are healing properly.

Some athletic trainers may also be responsible for

Coordinating care- Athletic trainers may need to coordinate care with other healthcare professionals.
Recruiting athletes- Athletic trainers may need to recruit athletes for research studies or clinical trials.
Providing customer service- Athletic trainers may need to provide customer service to their patients or the public.

How Long Does It Take to Become an Athletic Trainer?

It typically takes about four years to become an athletic trainer. The first two years are spent completing a bachelor’s degree in athletic training or a related field. The next two years are spent completing an accredited athletic training program. After graduating from an athletic training program, the new athletic trainer must pass a certification exam.

What Is the Career Path for an Athletic Trainer?

The typical career path for an athletic trainer includes:

Graduating from an accredited athletic training program- After completing an accredited athletic training program, the new athletic trainer must pass a certification exam.
Becoming certified- In order to become certified, an athletic trainer must be at least 18 years old and have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited athletic training program.
Working as an assistant athletic trainer- Many new athletic trainers start their career by working as assistant athletic trainers.
Working as a head athletic trainer- After gaining experience, some athletic trainers may be promoted to the position of a head athletic trainer.

What Are the Job Prospects for an Athletic Trainer?

The job prospects for an athletic trainer are good. There is a high demand for athletic trainers, and the occupation is projected to grow by 20% from 2016 to 2026. This growth is due to the increasing popularity of sports and the increasing number of injuries that are occurring.

Athletic trainers can work in a variety of settings, including hospitals, clinics, schools, and professional sports organizations. They may also work as physical therapists or athletic trainers. Athletic trainers typically earn a good salary, and the job is predicted to have good job prospects in the future.

What Are the Education Requirements to Become an Athletic Trainer?

The education requirements to become an athletic trainer vary by state. However, most states require that athletic trainers be certified by the National Athletic Trainers Association (NATA). In order to become certified, you must have a degree in athletic training from an accredited program. You must also pass a certification exam.

Many athletic trainers also obtain their graduate degrees in athletic training. This allows them to become certified as specialists in sports medicine. Athletic trainers who have a graduate degree may have better job prospects and earn more money.

Athletic trainers are healthcare professionals who help people recover from injuries. They provide education on how to prevent injuries, and they monitor the progress of their patients to ensure that they are healing properly. Some athletic trainers may also be responsible for coordinating care with other healthcare professionals, recruiting athletes for research studies or clinical trials, or providing customer service.

What Type of Job Can an Athletic Trainer Expect?

An athletic trainer can expect to work in a variety of settings, including:
Schools- Athletic trainers may be employed by schools to work with the athletes on campus.
Hospitals- Athletic trainers may work in the sports medicine department of a hospital.
Clinics- Athletic trainers may work in a private clinic setting.Professional Sports Organizations- Athletic trainers may work for professional sports teams or leagues.
Physical Therapist- Some athletic trainers choose to become physical therapists instead of working as athletic trainers.
Athletic Trainer- Some athletic trainers choose to work as athletic trainers instead of becoming physical therapists.

What Does a Typical Day Look Like for an Athletic Trainer?

A typical day for an athletic trainer may involve:

Meeting with athletes to assess their injuries and provide treatment- Athletic trainers often meet with athletes one on one to assess their injuries and provide treatment.
Providing education on injury prevention- Athletic trainers often provide education on injury prevention to athletes, coaches, and parents.
Monitoring the progress of patients- Athletic trainers often monitor the progress of their patients to ensure that they are healing properly.
Coordinating care with other healthcare professionals- Athletic trainers may need to coordinate care with other healthcare professionals, such as physical therapists or doctors.
Recruiting athletes for research studies or clinical trials- Athletic trainers may also be responsible for recruiting athletes for research studies or clinical trials.
Providing customer service- Athletic trainers may need to provide customer service to athletes, coaches, and parents.

What Is the Working Environment for an Athletic Trainer?

The working environment for an athletic trainer can vary depending on their job setting. Athletic trainers who work in schools may have a typical office environment, while those who work in hospitals may have a more clinical environment. Athletic trainers who work in clinics may have their own private office, or they may share an office with other healthcare professionals. 

Athletic trainers who work for professional sports teams may have a more hectic work environment, as they may be on the road with the team. Athletic trainers who are physical therapists may have a more clinical work environment. Athletic trainers who are athletic trainers may have a more typical office environment.

What Courses Can I Pursue to Become an Athletic Trainer?

Athletic trainers need a degree from an accredited athletic training program. Most athletic trainers obtain their undergraduate degrees in athletic training, but some may also obtain their graduate degrees in athletic training. There are a number of different courses to choose from, some of the popular ones are:  

  • Anesthesiology- This course explores the study of human movement.
  • Exercise Science- This course examines the effects of physical activity on the body. 
  • Sports Medicine- This course focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of sports injuries. 
  • Clinical Exercise Physiology- This course provides an in-depth look at how physical activity can be used to prevent and treat disease. 

Are There Any Certification or Li Censure Requirements for Athletic Trainers?

Athletic trainers need to be certified by the Board of Certification (BOC) in order to practice. The BOC offers a variety of different certifications depending on their area of practice. Athletic trainers must also be licensed in the state where they practice. Laws and regulations vary by state, so it is important to check with your state’s licensing board to see what is required.

Best Colleges to Study Athletic Training

Becoming an athletic trainer is a great choice for those who are passionate about helping people stay healthy and preventing injuries. There are a number of different colleges that offer accredited athletic training programs. 

The College of St. Scholastic- This college offers an undergraduate and graduate Athletic Training program.
Athletic trainers at the College of St. Scholastic are educated in a variety of different settings, including the classroom, laboratory, and clinic.

The University of Utah- This college offers an undergraduate Athletic Training program that is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).
The University of Utah prepares its students to work in a variety of different settings, including hospitals, clinics, and schools.

The University of Kentucky- This college offers an undergraduate Athletic Training program that is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE).

At the University of Kentucky, students have the opportunity to learn from some of the best athletic trainers in the country. 
There are many other great colleges that offer accredited Athletic Training programs, so it is important to do your research and find the program that is best suited for you.

Conclusion

Athletic trainers are responsible for helping athletes prevent and recover from injuries. They work in a variety of settings, including schools, colleges, hospitals, and professional sports teams. To become an athletic trainer, you need to earn a degree from an accredited program and pass the Board of Certification (BOC) exam. There are many opportunities for advancement in this field, so if you’re interested in becoming an athletic trainer, now is a great time to pursue this career path.

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